Display “big talkers” clients on cDOT

It is a common request from customer that wants to know who are the most active clients to a system. Though not hard to obtain, there is no obvious menu that lets you do that, so there it is :

First of all, you need to be in advanced mode and start statistics collection for the “client” object :

netapptest2::*> set advanced
Warning: These advanced commands are potentially dangerous; use them only when directed to do so by NetApp personnel.
Do you want to continue? {y|n}: y

netapptest2::*> statistics start -object client
Then you let it run for some time, and you can start looking at who the most active clients are :
 netapptest2::*> statistics show -object client -instance !Cluster* -sort-key nfs3_ops -counter nfs3_ops -tab

ntap2_vs1: client: 5/31/2016 23:59:26

instance nfs3
 name ops
 ---------------------- ----
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.245.11 31
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.95 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.67 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.60 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.58 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.43 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.40 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.39 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.37 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.33 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.235 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.234 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.226 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.225 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.223 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.221 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.218 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.195 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.19 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.183 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.18 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.158 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.157 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.156 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.134 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.133 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.132 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.124 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.120 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.118 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.114 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.113 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.108 0
 ntap2_vs1:10.20.45.100 0
 34 entries were displayed.

You can use another field instead of nfs3_ops, just use “?” character to get a list of available fields when you get to that part of the command line.

Here are the options available at this time, you can also use multiple fields by using a comma “,” separator.

  cifs_ops                    
  cifs_read_ops               
  cifs_read_size              
  cifs_write_ops              
  cifs_write_size             
  instance_name               
  instance_uuid               
  local_ops                   
  mount_ops                   
  nfs2_ops                    
  nfs3_ops                    
  nfs4_ops                    
  node_name                   
  node_uuid                   
  process_name                
  remote_ops                  
  rx_data                     
  rx_packets                  
  total_ops                   
  tx_data                     
  tx_packets                  
  vserver_id                  
  vserver_name

Configuring Network for NetApp Virtual Appliances in Fusion

NetApp Virtual Appliances like OnCommand Unified Manager 6 or OnCommand Performance Manager 1 are normally deployed within VMware ESX hypervisors. It can work on other hypervisors as well but it requires additional steps to workaround an error that occurs when you try to set the IP address to something else than DHCP. The purpose of this article is to explain how to make IP configuration available when you setup the virtual appliance in a lab-on-laptop lab, or anywhere else that is not a ESX server.

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New to NetApp? Where should I go now?

Hanging around on NetApp communities, I came across that post from a freshly NetApp certified person wondering about where to go next, and how to gain experience with NetApp storage. Long story short (since this was not exactly what Fabian was looking for), I started to think about good learning tricks and how my personal experience would be worth sharing.

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System Manager 3 for Mac

Here is an integrated version of System Manager 3 for the Mac.

Of course, this is an absolutely not supported version of System Manager. The reason why I decided to provide it to the public is because it does not use any private materials from NetApp, and is only based on the Linux version of System Manager, which is available on NetApp Support Site.

You can download it here, and you need Mac OS 10.7 minimum to run it.

This is different from the version available on ToolChest web site, and I thank Jesse for his work because without it, I wouldn’t have the idea to work on this version!

Here is a screenshot of the main window with the tab view on top, each controller you open will have its own tab.

System Manager 3 for Mac home page

System Manager 3 for Mac home page

System Manager 3 for Mac requires Java SDK 1.7 (JRE is not enough) and Mac OS 10.7.

Note that if you run it without installing the JDK, Mac OS X will automatically propose to install Java. Don’t do this as you won’t get a JDK this way, you must download it from Oracle web site and install it manually.

[EDIT] Link updated to point to version 3.1RC1

Snapmirror data from 7-mode to Clustered Data ONTAP [Screencast]

In this screencast I will show you how to migrate your data from a 7-mode system to a Clustered Data ONTAP system without using add-on software.

Note that I strongly encourage using 7MTT tool but if for some reasons, you want to do that manually, here is how.

In this video, you will see :

  • How to create the destination SVM
  • How to create the destination volume
  • How to establish a peer relationship
  • How to create the snapmirror relationship
  • How to do the cutover

Installing OnCommand Unified Manager on CentOS

CentOS is my favorite Linux distribution because it is the closest to RedHat you can find (for a reason). And I like RedHat for the simple reason that it is the most supported Linux distribution for any enterprise applications. I know usually both RedHat and SuSE are supported, but SuSE and I was never a love story and I will save you the history of this little drama for this time.

So, the idea is not to run CentOS in a production environment, unless you really have the heart of a warrior and do not care about being supported by a rock solid editor, but instead to run your OnCommand Core lab on a free OS.

I used a CentOS 6 minimal install for this tutorial.

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Serve DNS load balancing IPs on a non data network

[EDIT] Please use caution when setting up your environment according to this article. In some case, especially when using BIND DNS server with non-default parameters, you may end-up with requests going to data LIF even if they are on the storage network and you set “-listen-for-dns-query false” on it.

I got an interesting question from a customer about the way DNS load balancing is served in a cluster.

For network topology reasons, they needed to serve DNS requests on a network different from the data network used by the clients to access storage.

The problem is that Data ONTAP only listens to DNS requests on data LIFs that has been configured for DNS load balancing. The obvious issue is that if you configure an additional LIF on the management network, the load balancer will start serving this IP to the clients, which might not be the optimum path or even not routed at all.

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Setting up your very own lab with VMware Fusion Pro

There are two things I love more in my work than everything else : how smart is the way we (NetApp) store data, and virtualization (especially VMware). When you realize how accessible are these technologies today, you understand it gets pretty easy to get your own lab running on your laptop, as long as you have a bunch of RAM available.

Ok, I must admit I’m not running  “cheap” hardware, but like a lot of my coworkers, I chose to work on a high-end MacBook Pro with 16GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD drive. SSD and RAM is the key here, remove one or the other and that’s going to be painful. I use my lab all the time, it saves me the hassle of finding a lab and setup base environment, and if saves me time, it also makes my customer happier.

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